Drywall: Horizontal vs. Vertical Installation : Wall Repair

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6 responses on “Drywall: Horizontal vs. Vertical Installation : Wall Repair

  1. Martin R

    Lol at all of you guys…. look it all depend on the size of the drywall…
    8ft 10ft or 12ft… and the higth of the room…. vertical if the hingth is
    less then the length of the sheet.. and vertical when working on long tall
    walls…. 

  2. Martin R

    Lol at all of you guys…. look it all depend on the size of the drywall…
    8ft 10ft or 12ft… and the higth of the room…. vertical if the hingth is
    less then the length of the sheet.. and vertical when working on long tall
    walls…. 

  3. John Single

    I think I have a situation that fits. If I hang horizontally, my walls are
    so tall that two sheets aren’t tall enough, and I need another 30 inch tall
    sheet, given the time to then finish that extra cut seam, I think I am
    better off going vertical.

  4. Julian Castro

    drywall is installed horizontally because studs are not 100% straight your
    joint might end in a crooked stud, laying your drywall horizontally
    will make your wall straighter, also it must be in the opposite direction
    then exterior plywood, it wouldn’t pass inspection where i live, they
    wouldn’t make 10′ 12′ sheets. 

  5. mossutoconstruction

    I am a general contractor, I have been hanging sheet rock since 1988, of
    all the houses and commercial building I have hung with many many other
    journeyman hangers, we never hang sheetrock vertically. The reason is
    because the sheet rock creates strength to the wall, the butt joints are
    not to be “rail roaded” in other words, not lined up fro top sheet to
    bottom sheet. The building codes are very strict about this. if a wall
    shifts, the vertical joint will crack. The butt joints are not hard to
    hide, they are pre cut, even when its a factory to factory edge. then
    filled with hot mud to prefill and prevent blisters from air bubbles under
    the tape. they are finished with two passes from 10 in knive then three
    wide 12 in knife. The reason there has been confusion on this is because
    non load baring walls such as steel stud walls in commercial buildings that
    have drop ceilings, are ok to hang vertically because there is no ceiling,
    and are easier to tape. but residential and with ceilings, yes. If you do
    not know why they never have hung vertically its not because it simply
    never occured to them to do so after its been invented. lol there is a
    reason, now you know. ask a contractor or look up the local codes. Thanks.